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two pair

assign a numeric value for cards 2 through ace (where ace is 14).

when you achieve two pair in a standard sort of poker game, what if the hand that wins is not the one that is closest to ace, but the hand whose sum of the two pair is higher?

e.g. aces and threes sum up to 17, so someone holding 10s and 8s would beat them.

poker also needs to introduce the "skip straight". (5, 7, 9, J, K)

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taren_
Oct. 26th, 2007 12:50 am (UTC)
why hello thar math+gambling questions

It wouldn't change the overall odds of winning, just redistribute the win/lose draw cases. For example, AA22* and 9977* would draw while normally it's a win for AA22.

Skip straight would be amazing but people would NEVER get it

Also, mini-straights like in yahtzee
lifeofmendel
Oct. 26th, 2007 07:53 am (UTC)
ah, but it changes some of the odds for hold 'em from a situational standpoint.

Let's say that you have QJ in your hand. The board is Q A 6 10 rainbow (no flush possibility). The pot has $400 in it and you have $100 left to play with. Your opponent has you covered.

Suppose your opponent is first to act and he pushes you all-in, but he's a dope and accidentally shows you his cards: A6. So he has two pair.

the way that poker treats 2p now, you have 7 outs to win on the river card - the three remaining Qs and all 4 Ks whcih make you a straight. With 44 cards left in the deck, that gives you roughly 6:1 odds that you'll win. Calling his bet would mean that you're putting $100 in to win $500, or 5:1 odds. the odds of winning are worse than the pot odd investment, so you shouldn't call.

But if you change the way 2p is weighted to make the sum win over the "closest to the ace", now you have 3 more outs (the three remaining jacks) that will win you the pot, giving you 10 outs. This increases your odds to 4.4:1. which is now better than 5:1, so now you *should* call.

this change would do a lot for preflop hand values and post-flop play in general - with a board like 2 2 7 8 J, for example, if i hold 78 in regular poker, the fact that the board paired the 2 makes my hand less valuable because my opponent will have 2p just by having a single J in their hand. But with the 'sum' idea, now 78 *beats* jacks and 2s. This makes hands like 10J and JQ more valuable than A2 or A3. right now hands with one over card are only marginally better as it is - this would probably make them more coin-tossy situations probability wise.
nytelyte
Oct. 26th, 2007 01:14 am (UTC)
I want skip straight.
edrake
Oct. 27th, 2007 03:07 pm (UTC)
would the skip straight be in addition to the other hands, including the consecutive straight, or would the skip straight replace the consecutive straight?

qué interesante... i like this whole "sum" poker idea...
lifeofmendel
Oct. 27th, 2007 04:16 pm (UTC)
it would definitely be an additonal hand. it'd rank between 2 pair and a straight.

mallory says hi.

well. she's just miaowing in a whiny fashion, and i'm calling it saying hi. :)
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